CyberGuerrilla 2011
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By Anonymous avatar | September 22, 2011 - 22:46 | Posted in AnonyNews | 2 Comments

Member of Hacking Group LulzSec Arrested for June 2011 Intrusion of Sony Pictures Computer Systems

LOS ANGELES—A member of the LulzSec hacking group was arrested this morning for his role in an extensive computer attack against the computer systems of Sony Pictures Entertainment, announced André Birotte Jr., the United States Attorney in Los Angeles; and Steven Martinez, Assistant Director in Charge of the FBI’s Los Angeles Field Office.

Cody Kretsinger, 23, of Phoenix, Arizona, was arrested this morning by FBI agents without incident. On September 2, 2011, a federal grand jury returned an indictment filed under seal in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles charging Kretsinger with conspiracy and the unauthorized impairment of a protected computer. The federal indictment was unsealed this morning upon Kretsinger’s arrest.

From approximately May 27, 2011, through June 2, 2011, the computer systems of Sony Pictures Entertainment were compromised by a group known as “LulzSec,” or “Lulz Security,” whose members anonymously claimed responsibility on LulzSec’s website. Kretsinger, also known by the moniker “recursion,” is believed to be a current or former member of LulzSec. The extent of damage caused by the compromise at Sony Pictures is under investigation.

According to the indictment, Kretsinger resided in Tempe, Arizona at the time the alleged criminal activity took place. In order to carry out the attack, Kretsinger allegedly sed a proxy server in an attempt to mask or hide his Internet Protocol (IP) address. The indictment alleges that Kretsinger and other coconspirators obtained confidential information from Sony Pictures’ computer systems using an “SQL injection” attack against its website, a technique commonly used by hackers to exploit vulnerabilities and steal information.

The indictment alleges that Kretsinger and his co-conspirators distributed the stolen information, including by posting the information on LulzSec’s website, and then announced the attack via its Twitter account. The indictment further alleges that, in order to avoid detection by law enforcement, Kretsinger permanently erased the hard drive of the computer he used to conduct the attack on Sony Pictures.

LulzSec is known for its affiliation with the international group of hackers known as “Anonymous.” Anonymous, according to the indictment, is a collective of computer hackers and other individuals located throughout the world that conduct cyber attacks, including the dissemination of confidential information stolen from victims’ computers, against individuals and entities they perceive to be hostile to its interests.

In the recent past, LulzSec has been linked to the hacking or attempted hacking of numerous targets, including various websites that represent governmental or business entities, among others.

Kretsinger will make an initial appearance before a federal magistrate in U.S. District Court in Phoenix today. The government will request that Kretsinger be removed to Los Angeles, the district in which he was charged, to face prosecution. If convicted, Kretsinger faces a statutory maximum sentence of 15 years in prison. This investigation was conducted by the Electronic Crimes Task Force (ECTF) in Los Angeles. The ECTF is comprised of agents and officers from the FBI, United States Secret Service, Los Angeles Police Department, Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, United States Attorney’s Office, Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office, and the California Highway Patrol.

This case is being prosecuted by the United States Attorney’s Office in Los Angeles.

An indictment merely contains allegations that a defendant has committed a crime. Every defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty at trial.

Media Contact:
FBI Media Relations: 310 996-3343



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2 Responses to Member of Hacking Group LulzSec Arrested for June 2011 Intrusion of Sony Pictures Computer Systems

  1. avatar

    SAN FRANCISCO—Law-enforcement officials arrested and indicted alleged hackers that they said had taken part in a spate of attacks that targeted the computer networks of major companies and governments.

    On Thursday, the Federal Bureau of Investigation said it had arrested 23-year old Cody Kretsinger for an allegedly extensive computer attack against Sony Pictures Entertainment, a division of Sony Corp.

    Mr. Krestinger was allegedly part of Lulz Security, a group of hackers that carried out digital break-ins during which they targeted a range of entities, including Nintendo Co., the Central Intelligence Agency and U.S. public broadcaster PBS. The FBI said he is expected to appear in Los Angeles in October.

    Also on Thursday, a federal grand jury in San Jose, Calif. indicted two members of a hacking collective called “People’s Liberation Front.” The two men—Christopher Doyon, 47, and Joshua John Covelli, 26—were indicted on charges related to an alleged cyberattack against the county of Santa Cruz, Calif.’s website. The attack, which the U.S. Department of Justice said occurred on Dec. 16, was allegedly in retribution for Santa Cruz city’s enforcement of a municipal code called “Camping Prohibited.”

    The People’s Liberation Front is also accused of being associated with other hacking groups, such as “Anonymous,” a loosely federated group of cyber protesters.

    Mr. Covelli is also under indictment for his alleged participation in an attack against PayPal that happened around the same time.

    The FBI didn’t have records of Mr. Krestinger’s lawyers. Legal representatives for MR. Doyon and Mr. Covelli, whose names were released by the Department of Justice, didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment.

    The legal maneuvers come nearly half a year after hackers broke into Sony’s online videogame service, compromising more than 100 million user accounts. The initial attack was followed by a series of high-profile break-ins at other companies and government agencies.

    Governments around the world have since begun arresting alleged hackers for their involvement, but analysts say hacking attacks have continued in much more quiet fashion.

    Read more: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111903791504576588000221629340.html#ixzz1YnyoHfpy

  2. avatar

    FBI Arrests LulzSec Hacker, Indicts 2 Others on Cyberattacking Charges

    Updated: Friday, 23 Sep 2011, 8:06 AM EDT
    Published : Friday, 23 Sep 2011, 8:06 AM EDT

    (The Wall Street Journal) – Law-enforcement officials arrested an alleged hacker and indicted two others, claiming that they had taken part in a spate of attacks that targeted the computer networks of major companies and governments.

    The FBI said Thursday that it had arrested 23-year-old Cody Kretsinger for an allegedly extensive computer attack against Sony Pictures Entertainment.

    Krestinger was allegedly part of Lulz Security, aka LulzSec, a group of hackers that carried out digital break-ins during which they targeted a range of entities, including Nintendo, the CIA and US public broadcaster PBS. The FBI said he is expected to appear in Los Angeles in October.

    Also Thursday, a federal grand jury in San Jose, Calif. indicted two members of a hacking collective called People’s Liberation Front. The two men — Christopher Doyon, 47, and Joshua John Covelli, 26 — were indicted on charges related to an alleged cyberattack against the county of Santa Cruz, Calif.’s website.

    The attack, which the US Department of Justice said occurred on Dec. 16, was allegedly in retribution for Santa Cruz city’s enforcement of a municipal code called “Camping Prohibited.”

    The People’s Liberation Front is accused of being associated with other hacking groups, such as Anonymous, a loosely federated group of cyber protesters.

    Covelli is also under indictment for his alleged participation in an attack against PayPal that happened around the same time.

    The legal maneuvers come nearly half a year after hackers broke into Sony’s online videogame service, compromising more than 100 million user accounts. The initial attack was followed by a series of high-profile break-ins at other companies and government agencies.

    Governments around the world have since begun arresting alleged hackers for their involvement, but analysts say hacking attacks have continued in much more quiet fashion.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal

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