By r0gu3Sec | October 31, 2016 - 21:08 | Posted in CyberGuerrilla | 1 Comment
There’s no way your Facebook “check-in” is confusing North Dakota cops

This Facebook plea is similar to calls in 2009, during the controversial presidential election in Iran, where supporters of the Green Movement urged people to change their Twitter location to Tehran. Similarly, there was no indication that this action mitigated local Iranian authorities’ ability to arrest protesters.

The Sacred Stone Camp, one of the primary organizers of the Dakota protesters who are on site, told Ars in a statement:

There is no solid line between “organizers” and others this is a movement, not an organization.

There are many camps and points of contact, we can only verify that it did not originate from the Sacred Stone Camp FB page. We support the tactic, and think it is a great way to express solidarity.

A Standing Rock Sioux flag flies over a protest encampment near Cannon Ball, North Dakota where members of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and their supporters have gathered to voice their opposition to the Dakota Access oil Pipeline (DAPL), September 3, 2016. Drive on a state highway along the Missouri River, amid the rolling hills and wide prairies of North Dakota, and you'll come across a makeshift camp of Native Americans -- united by a common cause. Members of some 200 tribes have gathered here, many raising tribal flags that flap in the unforgiving wind. Some have been here since April, their numbers fluctuating between hundreds and thousands, in an unprecedented show of joint resistance to the nearly 1,200 mile-long Dakota Access oil pipeline. / AFP / Robyn BECK        (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

A Standing Rock Sioux flag flies over a protest encampment near Cannon Ball, North Dakota where members of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and their supporters have gathered to voice their opposition to the Dakota Access oil Pipeline (DAPL), September 3, 2016.
Drive on a state highway along the Missouri River, amid the rolling hills and wide prairies of North Dakota, and you’ll come across a makeshift camp of Native Americans — united by a common cause. Members of some 200 tribes have gathered here, many raising tribal flags that flap in the unforgiving wind. Some have been here since April, their numbers fluctuating between hundreds and thousands, in an unprecedented show of joint resistance to the nearly 1,200 mile-long Dakota Access oil pipeline. / AFP / Robyn BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

The copy and paste technique has created a unique way of generating numbers of support—it’s more impactful to see thousands of our friends take the time to create a unique status update.

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